a little tea candy

Word Candy Wednesday

Book quote

“If we can’t be open, Maureen thought, if we can’t accept what we don’t know, there really is no hope.”

from The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce

Finished this book yesterday. Starting it over again today.

Sitting in Estes: Mountain chickadee

Last Lent I did a series called “Sitting,” just observing what was happening in my backyard. I sat earlier this month in Estes Park, Colorado. Here’s what I saw:

This bird took a little more work to photograph and to identify. We found it at Loch Vale. It would only come around us when we were standing. Since we had somehow climbed up the gorge (more on that tomorrow), I was tired enough to sit, even if it was cold.

Sitting in Estes: Steller’s jay

Last Lent I did a series called “Sitting,” just observing what was happening in my backyard. I sat earlier this month in Estes Park, Colorado. Here’s what I saw:

At Alberta Falls, a black squirrel stole a girl’s energy bar, and the Steller’s jay took off after the squirrel. It didn’t get the energy bar, but it did get some of my Craisins.

Sitting in Estes: Gray jay

Last Lent I did a series called “Sitting,” just observing what was happening in my backyard. I sat earlier this month in Estes Park, Colorado. Here’s what I saw:

I heard it before I saw it. Who knew that when you stop to sit after hiking in the snow, it’s cold! I ate standing up, shifting from foot to foot.

I scanned Lake Bierstadt for the sound, but it was right behind us. The bird (which I did not identify until later) was sitting on top of the pine tree, just like a partridge in a pear tree.

Sitting in Estes: Elk

Last Lent I did a series called “Sitting,” just observing what was happening in my backyard. I sat earlier this month in Estes Park, Colorado. Here’s what I saw:

To get the full effect of this elk sighting, you must picture me wearing exactly what I describe—do not add clothing where clothing is not mentioned: flannel robe, wool socks, hiking boots, parka, gloves.

I spotted an elk off the porch, so I walked below the cabin to investigate. Then I realized there were a clump of five of them. I tried to walk on the patches of grass because they were quieter than the ice-covered snow. Once I got my camera ready, I saw a bull elk off to the right. So there were six.

I followed. More appeared. Seven. Eight. Wait, 11. Two bulls and nine does. Eleven elk a’grazing.

The sun was right in my eyes. If I knew how to do the Kelly effect and had a camera that could do that sort of thing, I’d have a great shot. But my best bet was to somehow get ahead of them without scaring them and shoot from behind.

They were relatively tame. Not shy, but cautious. The bulls eyed me at all times.

I moved to the road, which made me more silent. Finally, I could descend again into the grassy plain, with a ponderosa pine behind me to block the sun.

They grazed. Nuzzled. Nickered, like horses. One attempted to mount the other.

I kept watching. They decided I was probably not a threat, but two to three kept watch anyhow.

I got cold. Hungry. I climbed the hill, walking backward, keeping them in my sight. Then I turned away and headed back to the cabin. I paused at the door and turned around to see if the elk were still there, but the sun was blazing, obscuring them from my sight.

Sitting in Estes: Canada geese

Last Lent I did a series called “Sitting,” just observing what was happening in my backyard. I sat earlier this month in Estes Park, Colorado. Here’s what I saw:

These fellows were waddling around Lake Estes. They slipped on the ice, just like they were trying out skates for the first time. When we arrived, the weather was warm, so parts of the lake were unfrozen.

I love the trail around this lake, which reminds me a little of the trail around Lady Bird Lake in Austin. Lots of people and dogs. A few bikes.

Sitting in Estes: Black-billed magpie

Last Lent I did a series called “Sitting,” just observing what was happening in my backyard. I sat earlier this month in Estes Park, Colorado. Here’s what I saw:

I’m a sucker for birds, especially anything in the corvid family (crows, magpies, jays). I first discovered these birds when I was in Estes in August and wondered, “What are those black-and-white crows with the blue tails?” Well, they’re black-billed magpies.

Hint: If you need help identifying a bird, go to http://www.allaboutbirds.org, which is run by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

Someday, when I finish my crow story, I’m going to add in some of these guys.

My Roots

In the final Sitting post, my sweet aunt commented that I have good roots because I came from good roots. Well, I have evidence of the good roots I came from–specifically, my mom’s roots.

 

When Mom was starting chemo, she asked my father-in-law to make a meditation tape for her of her favorite scriptures. Here’s an excerpt from that email:

 

There are many scriptures that I love. You can pick and choose from this list, or record as many of them as you have the time and energy to record.

 

All of Ps. 23, 27, 30, 34, 91, 100, 103, 118, and 121.

 

Plus:

 

NT

 

Matt. 19:26

Mk. 10:51, 52

Jn. 9:1-3

Jn. 11:4

Acts 3:16

Rom. 8:17,37-39

Rom. 15:13

2Cor. 2:14,15

2Cor. 10:4,5

2Cor. 12:9,10

Eph. 3:14-20

Phil. 1:3-7,19

Phil. 4:4-7, 13, 19

Heb. 4:14-16

Heb. 11:1

James 5:13-16

 

OT

 

Gen. 50:20

Ex. 14:13,14

Ex. 23:20

Deut. 31:6

Deut. 33:27

Zeph. 3:17

Job. 23:10

2Sam. 22 (all)

2Chron. 20:15,17

Ps. 3:3-7

Ps. 33:18-22

Ps. 40:1-3

Ps. 46:1-3

Ps. 50:15

Ps. 51:6,7, 10-13, 15-17

Ps. 56:8-12

Isa. 30:15

Isa. 41:10.13

Isa. 43: 1-5, 19-21

Isa. 45:3,4

Isa. 46:3,4

Isa. 49:15,16

Isa. 54:17,18

Isa. 61:1-4

Jere. 17:14

Jere. 29:11-14

Jere. 32:27

Jere. 33:3,6

Hab. 3:17-19

 

Them’s 56 mighty fine roots, if I do say so myself!